UNSW Bragg Student Prize for Science Writing archives

Winners of the 2019 UNSW Bragg Prize announced

Are fertility tracking apps backed by science? Does automation really make us safer? Are we ready for driverless cars? Find out in these prize winning student essays

Does automation really make us safer?

"Errare humanem est": Winning essay for the 2019 UNSW Bragg Student Prize for Science Writing by William Flintoft of Melbourne Grammar School

Driverless cars: are we there yet?

Phoebe Adams of Presbyterian Ladies College was inspired by a family tragedy to explore driverless car technology in her winning essay for the 2019 UNSW Bragg Student Prize for Science Writing

The science (or lack thereof) behind period and fertility trackers

Abbotsleigh student Arwyn Stone questions the science (and ethics) behind fertility tracking apps in her winning essay for the 2019 UNSW Bragg Student Prize for Science Writing

Last week to enter the UNSW Bragg Student Prize for Science...

Calling all aspiring science writers in years 7-10! The UNSW Bragg Student Prize for Science Writing 2019 is now open for entries.

How this year 10 student won the 2016 UNSW Bragg Student...

Year 10 student Marissa Petrakis shares the thoughts and experiences that led her to write an award-winning science essay.

Here are the UNSW Bragg Writing Prize winners for 2018

This year’s UNSW Science Bragg Writing Prize was themed around ‘Technology and Tomorrow’. This year's winners weren't lacking in creative interpretation. Read about cyborgs and transhumanism, accessibility in tech and 40 years of MRI technology.

The pricey problem with assistive technology

18% of Australians with a disability live in poverty... but assistive technology clocks in at thousands of dollars per device. UNSW Bragg Writing Prize winner Preethika Mathan diagnoses the problem with disability tech in her investigative essay.

What is an MRI? This powerful technology turns 40 years old

UNSW Bragg Writing Prize runner up, Sienna Ters answers the question 'What is an MRI?' in her informative essay. The MRI was discovered 40 years ago, but it's far from outdated. Sienna investigates just how essential this tech is to medicine today.

Biohacking the future

As biohacking technology embeds itself into our everyday lives, we may be prompted to ask: how long until we are more computer than human? UNSW Bragg Writing Prize runners up, Coco Dwyer and Ruby Mumford investigate the seemingly inevitable future of biohacking and transhumanism.