Get a foot in the door at Commonwealth Bank

CBA graduate program
Studying something STEM-related but not sure where your degree could take you? These grads all work at Australia’s biggest bank. Image: Lauren Trompp

Whether you’re into programming or statistics, excited about fighting financial crime or keen to make products people use every day – this one grad program is full of possibilities

So you’re in your  final years of uni and are ready to take on the next challenge. You might think signing up for a graduate program will set you on a pretty specified career path – but in fact there is still plenty of room for choice and change once you take this next big step.

Take Commonwealth Bank’s Technology Graduate Program. Forget what you thought you knew about working in tech at a Bank. 

Are you obsessed with the idea of tracking down cyber criminals? Are you fascinated by making apps work? Are you deeply into big data and what AI can do? In this program you can focus exclusively on one passion, like Cyber, or take the path to try your hand at everything across Engineering and Data Science. 

A bit of everything

Zoe van Ammers always loved science, but it wasn’t until she was doing her Bachelor of Science at the University of Melbourne that she discovered her passion for software development. The 22-year-old is now 12 months into Commonwealth Bank’s 18-month graduate program, working in the engineering area.

CBA graduate
Zoe’s fave thing about programming? The satisfaction you get from finding a problem and fixing it.

Zoe says the program has given her some great exposure to many different kinds of projects, working with developers with all kinds of different skills and levels of experience.

“I came into the program not really knowing what type of software development I wanted to go into,” Zoe says. “I just knew I wanted to be exposed to the software industry and the different tools and technologies and ways of working.

“This program has allowed me to do that. I’ve been able to do some front-end work, back-end work, and a bit of DevOps. I’ve been able to reach out to people and learn about a lot of different parts of software development. It’s been really good exposure.”

Building careers and community

Zoe made the choice to relocate to Sydney from her former home in Melbourne last year and she says that even though a lot of the work so far has been remote due to COVID restrictions, the teams she has worked with have all been welcoming and friendly with lots of hands-on support from supervisors and other senior team members. 

“Our cohort is quite large – I think the 2022 grad cohort is over 100 tech graduates – and for those people who move from interstate like me it’s a very supportive environment,” she says. 

“There are lots of opportunities to meet people your own age and build up a bit of social life through work, which I think is very important.”

Commonwealth Bank supports graduates to work from their nearest capital city, taking a ‘work where the best work happens for you’ approach.

One of Zoe’s favourite things about programming is the satisfaction you get from finding a problem and then puzzling it out until you fix it. She says the work she has been doing over the last 12 months has given her opportunities to exercise her existing skills and exposed her to new programs and languages. 

Zoe says Commonwealth Bank grads can also work on side projects of their choosing in small teams and that really lets you explore whatever it is you’re passionate about.

Applications are now open, closing 21 March, for the 2023 Graduate Programs with Commonwealth Bank. Applications will open again in July for the 2023 Graduate Programs and the 22/23 Summer Intern program. 

If you’re a problem-solver looking for your next challenge in a supportive environment with one of the country’s biggest and most prestigious employers, this could be the place for you! – Rachael Bolton

This post was brought to you in partnership with Commonwealth Bank. Find out more about their graduate programs here.

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STEM Contributor

Author: STEM Contributor

This article was written by a STEM Contributor for Careers with STEM. To learn more, please visit our contact page.

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