Employer satisfaction with STEM grads reaches record levels

Graduate jobs
The ESS is the only national survey that measures how well graduates from Australian higher education institutions meet employer needs. Image: Shutterstock

So, what do employers really want? The Employer Satisfaction Survey took this question to Australia’s biggest workplaces

If you’re a fresh graduate or about to wrap up your degree, chances are that top employers and graduate programs are up there with your most-searched terms.  

But is there anything you can do to better the chance of scoring the job of your dreams? According to the latest Employer Satisfaction Survey (ESS) those that have graduated from a particular type of STEM degree have employers seriously impressed. 

Which type of STEM grads rank the highest?

We know that transferable, science, tech, engineering and maths smarts are invaluable in the future workforce and can lead to some seriously diverse employment pathways. But according to the ESS, there are particular types of STEM grad who has been given the most kudos in the last 12 months – engineering students!

Yep, up there with the tertiary backgrounds of the grads deemed most satisfactory by employers, were engineering and related technologies graduates (90%), health graduates (89%), architecture and building graduates (88%) and education graduates (87%). 

And the unis that the graduates rated highest had studied at? The University of Wollongong (92%), Australian Catholic University (89%) and Charles Darwin University (89%). 

With the overall satisfaction of graduates rated by direct supervisors at 85.3%, the results of the 2021 ESS emphasises the value of higher education qualifications for employment – and the role that uni can play in prepping students. 

The survey is epic – but if you’re planning your pathway it’s well worth a read. Check out the rest of it here. 

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Cassie Steel

Author: Cassie Steel

As Refraction’s digital editor, Cassie Steel spends her days researching robots and stalking famous scientists on Twitter.

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