Food technology

Food technology

Easing the way

Food technology can have a big impact on health and safety.

Our growing and ageing population needs more innovative young scientists working in health and food science, says Vaughan Gough, UQ graduate and research and development laboratory manager at specialist food manufacturer Flavour Creations.

Vaughan started working at Flavour Creations as part of an internship program at UQ, and his team now creates food and drink products for those with dysphagia – a common condition, especially in the elderly, that makes it difficult to swallow.

Vaughan’s Honours year helped to prepare him for the management role he now holds. “It was great for self-motivation and project management skills.”

Food technology students at UQ learn about the physics, biology and chemistry of food. This grounding now helps Vaughan to adjust ingredients like the thickeners and flavouring in products until they are just right. “There’s a lot of expertise and technology that goes into making the products,” he says. “It’s a great feeling to know that what I do improves people’s quality of life.”

– Cherese Sonkkila  

TO GET THERE: Bachelor of Food Technology (Hons), The University of Queensland

“It’s a great feeling to know that what I do improves people’s quality of life.”

Cherese Sonkkila

Author: Cherese Sonkkila

Cherese is a researcher and science communicator based in Melbourne, Australia. She is passionate about ecology and social science and loves getting out into the field.

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