Master of Cyber Security

master of cyber security

Spying the chance

Nikolai Hampton formalised 25 years in the IT sector to become a cybersecurity expert.

by Chloe Walker

As a kid, Nikolai Hampton enjoyed mucking around with electronics kits and a Commodore 64; later on, he dropped out of an engineering degree to work full-time as a computer salesperson. Now, he has more than two decades of experience in the IT sector and since 2009 Nikolai has run a business providing software solutions to the printing industry.

In 2016, Nikolai completed his first degree – a Master of Cyber Security at Edith Cowan University (ECU).

“I wanted to formalise 25 years of industry experience with some sort of qualification,” he says, adding that ECU’s track record in cybersecurity research and the accessibility of staff were major drawcards.

Studying by distance education from his home in Brisbane, Nikolai co-authored a conference paper with his supervisor Patryk Szewczyk, which won the best paper award at the 2015 Australian Information Security Management Conference.

This came as something of a surprise to Nikolai, who was diagnosed as dyslexic in high school. “It turns out I like writing!” he says. “Writing and reading were never things I thought I’d be strong at.”

The realisation led Nikolai to start a blog, and several posts, which he published under a creative commons licence, were republished on The Conversation. Now, Nikolai is a contributor to publications like Computerworld and makes regular appearances as a media commentator on tech security issues. He’s also contemplating a PhD.

“I’d never thought about doing research. I’d never thought about doing a PhD,” he says. “That was a foreign concept to me, but it’s definitely a possibility now.”

Click here to find out more about doing a Master of Cyber Security.

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1 Ancient future

Journey back in time and experience pre-settlement Australia through Indigenous eyes with Virtual Songlines. The game-like software package creates an immersive 3D-virtual reality, letting you explore the culture, arts and heritage of Australia’s first peoples with stunning detail and accuracy. You can hunt for a kangaroo or collect firewood as instructed by your elder. ab.co/2ae1Ues

2 Digital Dreamtime

Explore Indigenous sites through augmented reality app Digital Rangers. Developed by Indigenous-founded enterprise Indigital, the app uses object, location and image recognition to trigger stories on your phone with holographic detail. bit.ly/2aLHGKh

3 Meet and greet

Learn about the Indigenous heritage and culture of your location with the Welcome to Country iPhone app. Be greeted by an elder with a traditional ceremony video before learning about tribal customs. The app covers 30 tribes across Australia and can be used by tourists, schools, tourism organisations and government departments as an educational tool. bit.ly/2aLHgDp

4 Connected care

Whānau Tahi’s global software was originally developed for the Māori community to connect individuals and families and their support networks with health and social service professionals. The company recently received recognition as one of four leading providers in the global health software space in the 2016 Microsoft Worldwide Partner of the Year awards. bit.ly/2awogJm & bit.ly/2aJ0QhT

5 Cashed up

You can easily manage and grow the contents of your piggy bank with online educational program KidsCoin! Complete the lessons online and deposit your virtual dollars into your virtual bank account. KidsCoin was developed by Ngai Tahu entrepreneur Brittany Teei, who launched it shortly after winning the DigMyIdea Māori Innovation Challenge in late 2015. bit.ly/2aqpCW3 & bit.ly/2aW0yTk Indigenous tech

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Keep up to date with the latest information on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultural events, dates, services and significant places with the Trakka mobile app, created by the Indigenous Consulting Group working with elders and youth from the Fremantle community. bit.ly/2av3fus & iTunes: apple.co/2aLGRkm & Google Play: bit.ly/2bDMv83

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8 On the job

Using innovative computer science technology, iWork Jobsite improves employment opportunities for disadvantaged and ‘digitally excluded’ Indigenous people, connecting jobseekers, from high schoolers to professionals, with potential employers. In its first three weeks of going live, iWork had almost 10,000 unique visitors. bit.ly/2aqoJNr

9 Crack that code

Code Avengers helps you become a coding superhero, with online courses and coding camps so you can build your apps and games. The educational platform was recently a finalist in the Māori Innovation category of the New Zealand Hi-Tech Awards. bit.ly/2aLbZjK & bit.ly/2awrD32 – Gemma Conroy

9 ways that code connects

Tech tools may be the newest kids on the block but they're streets ahead in the communication game.

1 Ancient future

Journey back in time and experience pre-settlement Australia through Indigenous eyes with Virtual Songlines. The game-like software package creates an immersive 3D-virtual reality, letting you explore the culture, arts and heritage of Australia’s first peoples with stunning detail and accuracy. You can hunt for a kangaroo or collect firewood as instructed by your elder. ab.co/2ae1Ues

2 Digital Dreamtime

Explore Indigenous sites through augmented reality app Digital Rangers. Developed by Indigenous-founded enterprise Indigital, the app uses object, location and image recognition to trigger stories on your phone with holographic detail. bit.ly/2aLHGKh

3 Meet and greet

Learn about the Indigenous heritage and culture of your location with the Welcome to Country iPhone app. Be greeted by an elder with a traditional ceremony video before learning about tribal customs. The app covers 30 tribes across Australia and can be used by tourists, schools, tourism organisations and government departments as an educational tool. bit.ly/2aLHgDp

4 Connected care

Whānau Tahi’s global software was originally developed for the Māori community to connect individuals and families and their support networks with health and social service professionals. The company recently received recognition as one of four leading providers in the global health software space in the 2016 Microsoft Worldwide Partner of the Year awards. bit.ly/2awogJm & bit.ly/2aJ0QhT

5 Cashed up

You can easily manage and grow the contents of your piggy bank with online educational program KidsCoin! Complete the lessons online and deposit your virtual dollars into your virtual bank account. KidsCoin was developed by Ngai Tahu entrepreneur Brittany Teei, who launched it shortly after winning the DigMyIdea Māori Innovation Challenge in late 2015. bit.ly/2aqpCW3 & bit.ly/2aW0yTk Indigenous tech

6 Keep on track

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7 Lost in translation

Straker Translations makes clear communication quick and easy whether you’re grappling with Punjabi or Icelandic. Founded by Māori tech entrepreneur Grant Straker, the web-based service offers translation of more than 80 different languages for a range of sectors such as business, legal, television and tourism, and assists clients from all over the world. bit.ly/2aLIcrE Indigenous tech

8 On the job

Using innovative computer science technology, iWork Jobsite improves employment opportunities for disadvantaged and ‘digitally excluded’ Indigenous people, connecting jobseekers, from high schoolers to professionals, with potential employers. In its first three weeks of going live, iWork had almost 10,000 unique visitors. bit.ly/2aqoJNr

9 Crack that code

Code Avengers helps you become a coding superhero, with online courses and coding camps so you can build your apps and games. The educational platform was recently a finalist in the Māori Innovation category of the New Zealand Hi-Tech Awards. bit.ly/2aLbZjK & bit.ly/2awrD32 – Gemma Conroy

9 ways that code connects

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1 Ancient future

Journey back in time and experience pre-settlement Australia through Indigenous eyes with Virtual Songlines. The game-like software package creates an immersive 3D-virtual reality, letting you explore the culture, arts and heritage of Australia’s first peoples with stunning detail and accuracy. You can hunt for a kangaroo or collect firewood as instructed by your elder. ab.co/2ae1Ues

2 Digital Dreamtime

Explore Indigenous sites through augmented reality app Digital Rangers. Developed by Indigenous-founded enterprise Indigital, the app uses object, location and image recognition to trigger stories on your phone with holographic detail. bit.ly/2aLHGKh

3 Meet and greet

Learn about the Indigenous heritage and culture of your location with the Welcome to Country iPhone app. Be greeted by an elder with a traditional ceremony video before learning about tribal customs. The app covers 30 tribes across Australia and can be used by tourists, schools, tourism organisations and government departments as an educational tool. bit.ly/2aLHgDp

4 Connected care

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5 Cashed up

You can easily manage and grow the contents of your piggy bank with online educational program KidsCoin! Complete the lessons online and deposit your virtual dollars into your virtual bank account. KidsCoin was developed by Ngai Tahu entrepreneur Brittany Teei, who launched it shortly after winning the DigMyIdea Māori Innovation Challenge in late 2015. bit.ly/2aqpCW3 & bit.ly/2aW0yTk Indigenous tech

6 Keep on track

Keep up to date with the latest information on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultural events, dates, services and significant places with the Trakka mobile app, created by the Indigenous Consulting Group working with elders and youth from the Fremantle community. bit.ly/2av3fus & iTunes: apple.co/2aLGRkm & Google Play: bit.ly/2bDMv83

Indigenous tech

7 Lost in translation

Straker Translations makes clear communication quick and easy whether you’re grappling with Punjabi or Icelandic. Founded by Māori tech entrepreneur Grant Straker, the web-based service offers translation of more than 80 different languages for a range of sectors such as business, legal, television and tourism, and assists clients from all over the world. bit.ly/2aLIcrE Indigenous tech

8 On the job

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9 Crack that code

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cyber security

“I never thought about doing research…but it’s definitely a possibility now.”

Heather Catchpole

Author: Heather Catchpole

Heather co-founded Careers with STEM publisher Refraction Media. She loves storytelling, Asian food & dogs and has reported on science stories from live volcanoes and fossil digs

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