By:  Eliza Brockwell
February 27th, 2018

Mythbusting jobs: careers in care

Considering a career in care?

Many care careers are still flaunting their dated stereotypes; reductive ideas like social workers are child-snatchers, or nurses can only be female. We spoke to Artemicia and Gavin, a social worker and a nurse respectively, about their thriving careers and why they love working in care. Whether you’re a nurse, social worker or even an occupational therapist, care careers are rewarding and dynamic.

Artemicia Nisyrios

Social worker, director of Mindsight Psychology and Family Consulting

Social justice may not be the first thing that comes to mind when most people think of social work. Travelling the world, working in law or research probably doesn’t spring to mind either. If social work conjures ideas of child-snatchers or welfare-workers (and not much else…) then it’s time to get re-educated.

Artemicia Nisyrios is the director of Mindsight Psychology and Family Consulting. You can find her assessing risk and analysing behaviour patterns, consulting with lawyers, judges and health care professionals to provide expert testimony in family lawsuits dealing with violence, drug and alcohol abuse.

It’s a career that has seen her travel the world from the UK to India, and fostered her successful business.

“I have always had a passion for social justice, protecting the vulnerable people in our society, and challenging myself on a daily basis.” says Artemicia.

“I love meeting new people, hearing their stories and finding ways to help them help themselves.”

This area of social work is merely one of the many areas you can choose to specialise in. While the majority of social workers are employed in the health care sector, there are specialist positions available in just about every industry – from education, to manufacturing to media.

“Social Workers might not even work with people.” explains Artemicia. “Other opportunities include research positions, community development planners, political advisors and drivers of political change.”

It’s important not to stereotype social workers as ‘faultlessly kind’. It might be a career that requires you to be relatable, but they also need to be resilient, maintain objectivity, and be able to make “tough decisions”.

“Social Work is equally challenging as it is rewarding. The diversity of work in the field is endless and it is a skill that can open pathways for you all over the world.”

Study

> > Bachelor of Social Work (Hons), University of South Australia


Gavin Chipperfield

Registered Nurse, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Sydney

How often do you refer to a female lawyer? Or a male accountant? Not ever… so why are we still calling men ‘male nurses’?

“It’s one of the few professions that people seem comfortable putting the gender in front of the job title,” says Gavin Chipperfield, registered nurse at the Royal Prince Alfred Hospital.

For Gavin, nursing is a dream job. Each day is different from the next, and working with patients is more fulfilling and meaningful than the standard issue desk job. In his experience, gender bias doesn’t even seem to occur on a day-to-day basis.

“We are a rarity so I think it greatly works in our favour. Patients are often happy to have a male look after them for a change.” says Gavin.

According to a September 2017 census of registered nurses from the Nursing and Midwives Association, only 10.9% of nurses registered with the association are men. The seemingly constant nursing shortages could be rectified if more men were empowered to take up the profession.

“Nursing is an amazing job, it allows you to engage with people and help them when they are at their greatest need. I’d love to see more males take it up in the future.”

Study

> > Bachelor Human Movement/Bachelor of Teaching/PDHPE, Charles Sturt Uni

> > Master of Nursing, USyd

“I have always had a passion for social justice, protecting the vulnerable people in our society, and challenging myself on a daily basis.”

– Artemicia Nisyrios

“Nursing is an amazing job, it allows you to engage with people and help them when they are at their greatest need.”

– Gavin Chipperfield
Eliza Brockwell

Author: Eliza Brockwell

Eliza is the Digital Producer for Careers with STEM. Eliza is passionate about creating content that encourages diversity of representation in STEM.

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