Tuesday, April 23, 2019
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Careers with Code

Mia Alexiou

Director, Subsymbolic Software
Mia Alexiou studied cognitive and computer science before launching her own consultancy.

Norman Yue

Senior manager in application security
Norman Yue keeps the bad guys out of your bank account.

Toni James

Graduate software engineer
Toni James spent 15 years in the snowboard industry before changing careers and skilling up in computer science.

Tara McIntosh

Google researcher
Tara McIntosh took her PhD in computer science on to a research career in Melbourne and Seattle, and then to Google!

Livia Lam

Innovation solutions manager
Livia Lam brings people together to create smart ideas.

Michael Ascharsobi

Program manager
Michael uses computer science to re-imagine the way we work and help people in need.

Liz Broderick

Business and social change innovator
Liz Broderick hopes her story will help you discover your own passion.

Nathalia Tan

Cloud computing technologist
Nathalia Tan's unique skill set helped her find the perfect job.

Bella Tipping

Entrepreneur and app developer
"I want to change the way kids travel."

Michael Quandt

Software developer
“The more you learn, the easier it is to find ways to solve problems.”

Zahra Bagheri

Postgraduate student
"Explore the things around you and see how the world works."

Wayne Denning

Founder and managing director Carbon Media
“If you believe in something, it’s worth pursuing.”

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Maths is behind everything you do online: here’s how

The internet is powered by algorithms, like a more sophisticated version of the equations you’ll learn in class. So, why don’t we think of maths like that?