Systems controller

    Daniel Quevedo

    Cyber careers
    Daniel stresses that cyber technology will become even more prevalent in the future. Image: QUT

    Figuring out how humans and machines work together is just one of the research topics Daniel Quevedo has explored in his 20 plus years in the biz

    Daniel Quevedo has always loved a challenge. When he was deciding what to study at university after finishing high school in Chile, he chose the hardest subject he could find: electronics engineering. His keen interest in the subject convinced him to move all the way to Australia to do a PhD in electrical engineering and computer science. 

    “I enjoyed my time so much that I have never moved away from university,” says Daniel. “Although I have moved continents a couple of times!”

    Now a professor and researcher at QUT, Daniel’s latest challenge is to better understand how humans and machines interact with each other.

    One of Daniel’s more recent projects has been all about honing in on how people behaved when tasked with piloting a drone. Daniel and his team found that, at times, the more feedback people received about their drone-piloting skills, the worse they performed due to overestimating their abilities. The ultimate goal is to design systems that take human decision-making into account. 

    When he isn’t keeping an eye on rogue drone pilots, Daniel and his team are working on building systems that are resilient against cyber attacks, particularly those that rely on wireless technology. His research combines a huge range of different specialities, from systems control and communications to cryptography and signal processing. 

    “I have really enjoyed the variety of all the different projects I’ve worked on,” says Daniel. 

    And, according to Daniel, the career opportunities in tech and cyber are only going to keep growing, so it’s important to build skills that will take you far into the future. 

    “Cyber technology is a part of the world we live in and will become even more prevalent in the future,” says Daniel. “STEM concepts and tools can be used in a variety of areas that go beyond merely engineered systems.” 

    Daniel’s pathway

    • Bachelor of Engineering Electronics, Federico Santa María Technical University 
    • Master of Electrical Engineering, Federico Santa María Technical University 
    • PhD Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, University of Newcastle 
    • Professor in Cyberphysical Systems, QUT 

    This article was created in partnership with QUT and originally appears in the QUT STEM Guide 2022.

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    Gemma Conroy

    Author: Gemma Conroy

    Gemma is a freelance journalist with a passion for making science accessible to everyone. Gemma has a degree in biology from Macquarie University and loves sharing amazing discoveries with the world.

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