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The Buzz about STEM: Breaking down tech job myths

Our podcast, The Buzz About STEM, is for parents who want to help their teens navigate the journey into study or work after school. In this episode we talk tech job myths and how humans adapt to new technology.

Have you ever felt a bit of whiplash at the speed with which tech is moving? Our guest for this episode of the podcast is an expert on that, and more to the point, on how humans adapt to technology in their homes, like AI and voice assistants Siri or Alexa.

Yolande Strengers is a digital sociologist and the associate dean for equity, diversity and inclusion within Monash University’s faculty of IT. Yolande also co-designed a program with the Monash Tech School for school girls in year’s seven to nine, where they learn how to build their own voice bot, and in doing so gt a real-world idea of what a tech career might involve. 

Yolande is not a supporter of technology bans, like those we’re seeing of large language model ChatGPT, but instead says now’s a good time for parents to be talking to their children about the impact new technology is going to have on their lives and the lives of others.

“I think that the more programs we have that critically reflect on what are the impacts of this technology, how can we design it better, how is it going to fit into society and build a better society, you know, the better really,” Yolande says.

Listen to the podcast for more from Yolande on why we still need to breakdown tech myths, particularly for girls, and the increasing suite of options students have when they choose a tech career.

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