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UNSW Bragg Student Prize: 5 tips for teachers

UNSW Bragg Student Prize tips for teachers

This year’s topic, AI in science, is definitely a hot one. But how do you integrate it (and the competition) into your classroom?

We picked the brains of two of this year’s judges (who just so happen to be teachers) for fresh ideas! Below, you’ll find their UNSW Bragg Student Prize tips for teachers, based on what they’ll be doing at their own schools.

Hear from Donna Buckley, the Assistant Director of Mathematics and VET Cybersecurity teacher at John Curtin College of the Arts in Fremantle, plus Sarah Chapman who is the Head of Department of Science at Townsville State High School – she’s also in her twentieth year of teaching.

UNSW Bragg Student Prize tips for teachers

Donna Buckley suggests:

Donna Buckley, Assistant Director of Mathematics and VET Cybersecurity teacher at John Curtin College of the Arts

1. Incorporating the competition with the Mathematics Talent Quest competition that students complete as a mathematical modelling assessment in Year 8. This national wide competition run by AAMT allows students to submit a creative writing piece as their mathematical communication. The piece would have to have a strong mathematical foundation – for example, students could consider how data sets are trained to make predictive models.

2. Making sure the competition has been advertised on the school notice board and passed on to other STEM teachers.  

3. Integrating it with other subjects. At Donna’s school, the Year 9 Academic Extension coordinators for English, Maths, Science and HASS are planning to integrate it as an interdisciplinary task, with one lesson dedicated to discussing and learning about AI within the context of their learning area perspectives. There are a range of lesson ideas on the Digital Technologies Learning Hub.

4. Using the UNSW Bragg Prize for Science Writing as a part of Science Week school activities and publishing essays in the school magazine.

Sarah Chapman, Head of Department of Science at Townsville State High School

And Sarah Chapman adds:

5. Including the topic (AI in science) as a part of STEM and writing clubs to develop student skill and interest.

Want to know more about Donna, Sarah and the other brilliant UNSW Bragg Student Prize for Science Writing competition judges? Meet them here.

UNSW Bragg Student Prize for Science Writing 2023

The annual UNSW Bragg Prize is a science essay writing competition open to all Australian high school students in years 7 to 10. Not only are there some awesome prizes up for grabs for you and your class – it’s a great way to complement your studies across all areas including Science, English, History & Geography, Design & Technology and more!

The competition is now open and closes 5pm August 25, 2023.

You can also head to the competition page to get more resources on the competition topic – AI in science.

Want regular UNSW Bragg Prize updates and more excellent STEM education content for teachers? Sign up to our e-newsletter for weekly drops in your inbox!

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Love science and writing? The UNSW Bragg Student Prize for Science Writing opens for entries April 29.