Science

You can read Careers with STEM magazines online and order copies here.

Tom Cresswell, ecotoxicologist at ANSTO (pictured) is crouching in lake water holding a jar and fishing net. Ecotoxicologist is one of the environmental science jobs on this list.

What kind of environmental scientist are you?

If you’re looking to become an environmental scientist, we’ve got good news. Environmental science jobs are on the up and up, and you’re spoiled for choice in what type of scientist you could become. So, which type of environmental scientist are you?

famous female scientists quiz

Which famous woman in STEM are you?

These famous female scientists, mathematicians and engineers deserve more credit than they’ve been given. Take the quiz to see, which famous woman in STEM are you?

aerospace engineering jobs

How to land the Aerospace career of your childhood dreams

If your childhood astro-obsession is not just a fleeting infatuation, aerospace engineering jobs might be your calling. Here’s how you can break into space and aerospace engineering careers, whether that’s at university, in your spare time, or with your feet planted firmly on the ground!

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Murdoch University's WISE Women in STEM

Over 200 girls gathered together to hear from Murdoch University’s WISE Women in STEM. The outreach program saw multiple STEM women from around Australia share their personal and professional stories on how STEM skills benefit careers, and why dropping maths is a bad idea.

What is STEM and why is it important?

What is STEM and why is it important?

STEM is an acronym that stands for Science, Technology, Engineering and Maths. But, there’s much more to it than that. STEM education has a role to play in every single career field, as well as our economy and the innovation of world issues. We’ll answer the burning question: What is STEM and why is it important?

The March for Science Australia 2018

The March for Science 2018

The March for Science 2018 is running its second annual science march. Last year, 10,000 people joined the protest across Australia – 25% of them weren’t even employed in science! Whether you’re a science advocate or rookie, have your voice heard this weekend and join the march!